Achieving a higher quality of care

Achieving a higher quality of care

An increasing portion of society experience challenges in negotiating the physical aspects of their daily routines. Many years ago, ArjoHuntleigh introduced the Positive 8 philosophy in order to assist facilities in achieving a higher quality of care. This philosophy still holds true today. The Positive Eight identifies three prerequisites that must be in place to stimulate mobility.
• Sufficient space to allow for use of proper aids and correct working technique
• The provision of the proper aids to support the functional mobility of the resident
• The application of nursing best practice through correct ergonomic working techniques
The upper portion of the Positive 8; steps 1-4, pertain to the resident with steps 5-8 relating to the caregiver. Maintained or improved resident mobility and activity naturally leads to a reduced ependency on caregivers. In turn, less strain on the caregiver enables a higher quality of care. When one total cycle of the Positive Eight is completed, another cycle commences. This on-going process drives sustainable quality improvement. The care setting is also a key determinant in the application of the Positive Eight principles. Therefore, ArjoHuntleigh has evolved new variants of the philosophy to reflect different care settings. In long term care, the goal is to maintain resident mobility leading to improved caregiver productivity, while in acute care the goal is early mobilisation of the patient leading to reduced length of stay. The three prerequisites to the Positive Eight are decisive factors for the resident and caregiver, which benefit the whole care process.